Your email provider could sell your personal data


Editor’s note: Foxintelligence CEO Edouard Nattée contacted TechRadar Pro with a statement on this, saying:

For several days, our Cleanfox application has been the subject of unfounded accusations in the press which damage the reputation of our company. Not only are these accusations false and akin to defamation, they are also at odds with our beliefs and privacy commitments.

Since the very creation of Foxintelligence, we have chosen to be even more demanding than what is required by the General Regulations on the Protection of Personal Data (RGPD):

  • We have always been completely transparent about the business model of Cleanfox and Foxintelligence. Nothing is hidden in unreadable pages like the privacy policy or the terms of use. On the contrary, the economic model is clearly and simply indicated when the user gives us his consent.
  • We also undertake to never resell the personal data of our users, to not participate in any advertising targeting device and to not cause any harm to our users. Foxintelligence creates and sells anonymized and aggregated statistics, like any pollster.
  • We believe in a model where the service is free and the user is not the product.

It is for these reasons that we strongly reject recent accusations that Cleanfox sells user data to third-party companies. It is false and defamatory.

We also reject accusations that we are not transparent with our users. A simple visit to our website allows you to realize this.

Full transparency with our users

Before the user logs into Cleanfox, we detail in black and white our commitment to never sell personal data to third parties and only to market statistics based on anonymized and aggregated data.

Privacy Policy

All this is then detailed in an intelligible and simple way in our privacy policy, in our Faq and on the pages of Play at the store and the Apple Store. (Image credit: Foxintelligence)

Foxintelligence and Cleanfox have never and will never sell personal data to third parties

Cleanfox is a free service. Foxintelligence sells statistics such as the estimated revenue of e-commerce platforms or the growth rate of online sales.

To produce these statistics, we anonymize and aggregate the order confirmation emails (e-receipts). These statistics do not in any way constitute user profiling, they do not allow any kind of reconciliation with a user of our application.

The cases of data which would be “de-anonymized” mentioned by certain articles, are linked to a practice that we have always refused to follow: the pseudonymization of data, that is to say the attribution of a unique identifier to each user. . It is therefore impossible to link Foxintelligence statistics to any user.

We do not sell any data that will be used for ad targeting purposes.

Unlike most online services or social networks, Foxintelligence does not sell the personal data of its users. Foxintelligence’s business model is in no way linked to advertising. Thus, if you use Cleanfox, you will never subsequently be the object of targeted or untargeted advertising from third-party companies as a result of your registration with Cleanfox.

[Original article continues below]

Popular messaging apps like Edison, CleanFox, and Slice have been accused of selling information pulled from users’ inboxes without their knowledge.

According to a report from Motherboard, the information Edison collected was sold to companies involved in different activities such as e-commerce, finance, travel and others. Edison, on his home page, brags about offering “No Ads, Just Mail.”

In most cases, users weren’t aware their data was being sold, showing a worrying lack of clarity among many email providers.

Personal data

The report suggests that many users were unaware that Edison had deleted their data. However, Edison’s website privacy policy states that it “processes” users’ email data. Apart from this, Edison would also offer products such as “Edison Trends” and “Product Trends” which provide more in-depth behavioral models and analysis such as purchase metrics, brand loyalty and customer preferences. purchase deleted from the Edison messaging app.

Foxintelligence sells similar data pulled from an app called Cleanfox and has brands like Paypal, Bain & Company, and McKinsey & Company as customers. This is the COO, Florian Cleyet-Merle, admitted that he had collected data on users and said that “From a higher point of view, we think crowdsourcing transaction data have transformative power for both consumers and businesses and that a market where value can be created for both parties without compromising on privacy is possible. “

An app called Rakuten’s Slice helps customers track packages and provide price alerts. Sales data such as the name and brand of the product purchased were found based on usage, price, amount paid and a unique identification number for each buyer. In Slice’s case, users weren’t aware the company was selling their data, the research claimed. In fact, the company last month introduced an “unsubscribe” mechanism on its website.

Edison, in response to the above report, responded by saying that in order to keep the app ad-free, it only extracts anonymous business transactions related to e-commerce and has a system in place to “ignore personal and business emails, which do help us measure market trends.

The company said, “Edison prioritizes privacy in everything we do as a business and that includes educating our users about how we use their data in our products. You have full control over how your information is used and we allow you to opt out of data sharing in our research product, without affecting your app experience. We strive to be as transparent as possible about our business practices in our communications with the press, the Edison Mail website, the Edison Trends website, the privacy policy, blog posts, on our pages. from app store, on social media and, of course, in our app itself. We do not participate in any advertising targeting of our users and do not allow others to target our users with advertisements.

Going through: Vice


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